Read C/C++ Annotated Archives by Friedman, Art, Klander, Lars, Michaelis, Mark, Schildt, Herb (1999) Paperback by author Online

Title : C/C++ Annotated Archives by Friedman, Art, Klander, Lars, Michaelis, Mark, Schildt, Herb (1999) Paperback
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : B011YU9BHW
ISBN13 : -
Format Type : EPub
Language : Deutsch
Publisher : -
Number of Pages : 384 Pages
File Size : 895 KB
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

C/C++ Annotated Archives by Friedman, Art, Klander, Lars, Michaelis, Mark, Schildt, Herb (1999) Paperback Reviews

  • None
    2019-01-21 04:29

    The C/C++ AA book follows in the same liner as the JavaScript and Perl books by taking a close look at the source code that contributes to many real-world examples. With the C/C++ book each chapter deals with a different core element of a typical program covered in detail. You get great examples of core programming principles such as sorting, expression parsing, and even a small version of Basic all written in C/C++ with the annotated code.The annotations are clear, and the examples work - the addition of the CD certainly makes the process of using the sample much easier. If I was to pick two chapters that I found the most useful it would be the small internet browser, and the section on CGI programming for the web. Coming a close second are the two chapters written by Herb Schildt.If I had one single concern about the overall layout of the book it would be that many of the scripts have comments in them. Whilst this is fine for a standalone piece of source code, in a book that also annotates the source code, it's a little distracting.But ignoring that problem it's an excellent book, and well worth purchasing whether you are just learning the language or want to brush up on some of the more complex aspects of C and C++ programming.

  • None
    2019-01-19 04:45

    I bought this book thinking it would be a good reference, and also a source for some basic data structures in my own code. Well, I relied on the doubly linked list in the book as a base class for my own code. Don't use it. I never thought that this code could be wrong, but I tracked the problem down to the remove_val() function in this doubly linked implementation. If you use it, it will give you a Segmentation Fault error. I haven't tested out anything else, but so far my experience with the book has been very negative.

  • Steve Cothran
    2018-12-25 02:33

    First, the CD purported on the front cover to be "packed with ready to use code" contains slightly over 2mb of uncompressed source.The methods used in several sections are trivial to worthless. In the first chapter considerable analysis is given to a bubble sort. Fine, but the other methods are hardly better. AND the source had to be modified to run on my Borland compiler which objected to some mis-applied functions in these exceedingly simple examples.The back cover proclaims "The ultimate collection of robust code and expert techniques..". 2mb of trivial methods belie this.Overall there is way too much analysis ado over mostly trivial methods.I respect Herb Schildt who wrote the preface and recommend his "Teach yourself C++" way, way over this book.

  • None
    2019-01-24 01:54

    there are many mistakes in this code, most of which is trivial anyway. I contacted the person, at the email address provided on this book, got a response of acknowledgement but never got any corrected code, or instructions on how to get it through ftp etc. I'll be careful not to get burned by these authors again.

  • J. Turner
    2018-12-25 04:26

    I'm definitely in the minority here. I love these kinds of books. I find them a refreshing change from the continual stream of beginner/introductory C/C++ books that cover the same information over and over again ("hello world"). This book covers a lot of things that don't fall within the neat confines of the standard C++ primer, especially if you consider the Visual C++ genre.This book covers a lot of ground, much of it is in the form of annotated source code: sorting, linked lists, b-trees, performing financial calculations, statistical applications, and implementing language interpreters in C++.There are relatively few C++ classes in the source code. The bulk of the code is straight out C coding, to which C++ purist may object.Although it bills itself as compiler independent, the chapters on Internet programming and fractal graphics are pretty much Visual C++ all the way.

  • None
    2018-12-27 00:33

    I bought this book thinking it would be a good reference, and also a source for some basic data structures in my own code. Well, I relied on the doubly linked list in the book as a base class for my own code. Don't use it. I never thought that this code could be wrong, but I tracked the problem down to the remove_val() function in this doubly linked implementation. If you use it, it will give you a Segmentation Fault error. I haven't tested out anything else, but so far my experience with the book has been very negative.

  • Steve Cothran
    2019-01-18 22:46

    First, the CD purported on the front cover to be "packed with ready to use code" contains slightly over 2mb of uncompressed source.The methods used in several sections are trivial to worthless. In the first chapter considerable analysis is given to a bubble sort. Fine, but the other methods are hardly better. AND the source had to be modified to run on my Borland compiler which objected to some mis-applied functions in these exceedingly simple examples.The back cover proclaims "The ultimate collection of robust code and expert techniques..". 2mb of trivial methods belie this.Overall there is way too much analysis ado over mostly trivial methods.I respect Herb Schildt who wrote the preface and recommend his "Teach yourself C++" way, way over this book.

  • Alex
    2019-01-16 06:36

    I agree with the majority of reviews, this book isn't as good as it sounds. Haven't tried using the code, but thought it was in a poor object oriented style, and doesn't lend itself to reuse straight off the CD.A more detailed review an overview of the books chapters can be found at [...]